A hundred thousand welcomes

Unfortunately, due to circumstances outside of our control, posed to the current COVID-19 health crisis, the Parade has been postponed by the City of New Haven under the recommendation the Governor's Office. The Parade will be rescheduled. Please stay tuned for more information.

Additionally, in the interest of public safety, the Greater New Haven St. Patrick's Day Parade Committee has made the decision to postpone upcoming fundraising events until further notice. We thank you for your continued support, and look forward to new and rescheduled events in the future.

Céad Míle Fáilte -- A Hundred Thousand Welcomes -- from the Greater New Haven St. Patrick’s Day Parade Committee. The St. Patrick’s Day Parade tradition was born in New Haven on March 17, 1842, when about 90 members of the Hibernian Provident Society, a mutual aid organization formed the previous year, marched through the city streets behind a banner made especially for the occasion.

Lovingly sewn into the banner were traditional Irish depictions: St. Patrick in his bishop’s robes, an Irish wolfhound, a harp, shamrocks, and a portrait of Gen. Richard Montgomery, the Irish-born hero of the American Revolution. As Joan Moynihan and Neil Hogan, authors of “Images of America: New Haven St. Patrick’s Day Parade” explained, the banner had two mottos which bespoke the dual loyalties of the marchers: “e pluribus unum” and “Erin go bragh.”

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Since the mid-1950’s the St. Patrick’s Day Parade of Greater New Haven has become one of New England’s premier Irish events. It is the largest, single-day spectator event in the State of Connecticut. As the 6th oldest parade in the nation, its fame was recognized by the Library of Congress in 1999.  This keepsake of New Haven’s Irish community became a national keepsake when the Library of Congress selected the Greater New Haven St. Patrick’s Day Parade as an outstanding example of American folk life. (Moynihan and Hogan)

Thank you to all who participate, attend and support the Greater New Haven St. Patrick’s Day Parade. We are finalizing the 2020 parade which will take place on Sunday, March 15, 2020. We are very proud of this great tradition and we invite you to enjoy the information and history of our great parade in the pages of this web site!

Associated Irish Societies

The Parade Committee is officially known as the “Associated Irish Societies”. Currently the AIS is made up of 4 Irish organizations:

Background on the AIS

As the Irish population grew in New Haven various Irish organizations were formed: the Sons of Irishmen; Friendly Sons of St. Patrick; the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the oldest catholic lay organization in America; the Irish American Social Club; and the Knights of St. Patrick; (established on March 17, 1878, the Knights have held an annual banquet on St. Patrick’s Day since its inception). These organizations became known as the Associated Irish Societies, and over the years it has been their responsibility to organize and fund the parade along with two “newer” organizations, the New Haven Gaelic Football & Hurling Club and IACC in East Haven and the West Haven Irish American Club.

FRIENDLY REMINDER TO ALL PARADE GOERS AND PARTICIPANTS
Sec. 18-39. - Regulation of consumption and possession of alcoholic liquor upon public highways, public areas and parking areas; consumption and possession in unlicensed premises prohibited.

Prohibited acts.

(1)

Except as permitted in subsection (c) hereof, no person shall consume any alcoholic liquor, or possess any open container of alcoholic liquor upon or within the limits of any public highway, public area, or parking area within the City of New Haven. For purposes of this section, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the consumption of alcoholic liquor or the possession of an open container of alcoholic liquor in parked vehicles within or upon parking area or a public highway or sidewalk is a violation hereof.

Go Raibh Maith Agat